Hi, I’m aLLIE!

At 26-years-old, I found out that I have the early signs of ALS.

I was working at my first corporate job when I realized that my motor skills were deteriorating. Tasks as simple as buttoning my pants or writing down my name became excruciatingly difficult.

From there, my mid-20s were filled with anxiety and uncertainty, as I visited countless doctors trying to find an explanation for my sudden weakness.

My first blog post, What Happens When You Have the Early Signs of ALS, was written during this time. It painstakingly lays out what it feels like to come face-to-face with a possibly-terminal illness.

Since then, I’ve never actually found a diagnosis, except for the catch-all term, motor neuron disease. I consider myself fortunate that the weakness has stayed confined to my arms, considering the alternative.

Basically, my arms are paralyzed.

“I’ve spent years chasing a diagnosis while trying to adapt to my new life with a debilitating chronic illness. Now, I’m here to show you how I’ve learned to thrive along the way.”

The past few years haven’t been easy…

But they’ve surprisingly led me to a newfound appreciation for life that – I dare say – wouldn’t have been possible without my health challenges.

While facing a terminal illness, I’ve managed to find a supportive partner, have a baby, raise thousands of dollars for ALS research and start my own business. Now, with my arms completely paralyzed, I’m the happiest I’ve ever been!

And I want the same for you.

I’m dedicated to showing you how to take back your power and create a life full of acceptance, passion, and joy.

“I’ve learned how to accept a diagnosis and turn it into a source of inspiration.

My Philosophy

When you come face-to-face with mortality at such a young age, wisdom accelerates faster than normal.

At 26-years-old, I was given a pamphlet on how to grieve and told that I needed to get my affairs in order. While my peers were spending late nights out until 3 AM and working at startups with no health insurance plans, I was succumbing to medical debt and a motor neuron disease with a prognosis between 2 – 5 years.

For some unbeknownst reason, the disease has stabilized to a point where I haven’t had any weakness outside of my arms and hands. My health challenges are unique in that I understand what it’s like to be chronically ill, disabled, undiagnosed, have a rare and incurable disease, and a possibly-terminal illness. Because I fit into so many categories, I’ve had to learn a range of skills in order to adapt to my new life.

Perhaps the most shocking thing that I’ve noticed is the propensity that people have to procrastinate taking control of their life and figuring out what will make them happy. Too often, I hear friends and strangers say things like, “When I’m X age, I’ll finally take that trip to France that I’ve always wanted…”

You can’t wait for happiness. You deserve to live a fulfilling life today.

This disease has given me an invaluable perspective where I’m perpetually living in a state of both living + dying. However, although every person is in this same situation, we aren’t living in accordance with this awareness. I’m here to show you how to go beyond your diagnosis and create a meaningful life no matter your limitations or capabilities.

It’s easy to get angry because, let’s face it, health challenges suck, but there are ways to move beyond your feelings of despair and hopelessness. I’ve gone through all of this, and there are tactics that I have learned that will make it easier to overcome your diagnosis. My goal is to show you how to overcome your health challenges so that you’re free to take back control of your life and live the life you deserve.

Disability Dame is committed to creating a diverse and inclusive environment. You are welcome here no matter your race, spiritual identification, gender, gender identity or expression, sexual orientation, and/or disability.

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    “If you’re not living authentically in accordance with your value system, it will be hard to find happiness.”